CML Stem Cells Identified by Stanford Researchers

Posted by rob on August 11, 2004 under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

STANFORD, Calif.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Aug. 11, 2004–A handful of leukemia cells constantly replenish the supply of cancerous cells, according to new work by Stanford University School of Medicine researchers. These self-renewing cells, called cancer stem cells, are the ones chemotherapy must wipe out in order to eliminate the disease. Treatments that destroy these cells could more effectively eliminate cancer.

Current treatments destroy cancer cells indiscriminately, draining the reservoir of cancer cells without specifically eliminating the cancer’s source. “We were missing the boat because we were targeting the wrong cell,” said Catriona Jamieson, M.D., Ph.D., instructor in hematology and first author of the paper.

Other researchers have found cancer stem cells in acute myelogenous leukemia, breast cancer and two types of brain cancer. The current work, published in the Aug. 12 New England Journal of Medicine, is the first to describe these cells in chronic myelogenous leukemia. This is also the first time researchers have identified which cell becomes cancerous, transforming from a normal healthy cell to a cancer stem cell.

Jamieson and her team working with Irving Weissman, M.D., the Karel H. and Avice N. Beekjuis Professor in Cancer Biology, and hematology colleagues at Stanford, the University of Toronto and UCLA, found the cells through careful detective work. She separated the cancerous cells into subgroups, each with a characteristic pattern of proteins on their cell surface. She then put each of these populations on a separate lab dish to see which could renew their population. In the end, only one group of cells had the ability to self-renew, constantly dividing to produce both new stem cells and cells that matured.

Jamieson examined these cancer stem cells and found they resembled normal cells in the blood called granulocyte/macrophage progenitor cells. This finding came as a surprise. Researchers had thought that the cancer stem cells came from normal stem cells — such as the blood-forming stem cells in the bone marrow that produce both red blood cells and immune cells. Instead, Jamieson found that the cancer started when a normal adult cell mutated and gained the ability to self-renew.

Another surprise has to do with how chronic myelogenous leukemia develops. Most people with the disease have a mutation in which chromosomes 9 and 22 swap ends. This trade fuses genes coding for two different proteins into a single unit that makes a cancer-causing protein called BCR-ABL. All blood cells in these people carry the swapped chromosome, but only macrophage/granulocyte progenitor cells become cancerous.

Although the cancer stem cells still bore some resemblance to macrophage/granulocyte progenitor cells, they also stood apart. One difference was a protein called beta-catenin, found in abundance in the nucleus of the cancer stem cells. This protein is commonly found in embryonic cells where it keeps them in a dividing state. “What’s novel is that you have this gene turned on in a mature cell,” Jamieson said. The protein was particularly abundant in people whose cancers were resistant to the chemotherapy drug Gleevec.

Beta-catenin is part of a pathway kicked off by a protein called Wnt (pronounced “wint”), which has only recently been found to play a role in helping stem cells continue dividing. Wnt is normally only active in cells that must continually divide, such as stem cells and embryonic cells. Most adult cells don’t make Wnt and can only divide a limited number of times. In collaboration with Roeland Nusse, Ph.D., professor of developmental biology, and Laurie Ailles, Ph.D., a postdoctoral scholar in Weissman’s lab, the group found that blocking beta-catenin’s Wnt-activating role in the cancer stem cells also blocked their ability to self-renew.

Weissman said that proteins activating the Wnt pathway are commonly mutated in several types of cancer. What’s more, a strain of mice in which Wnt is inappropriately activated is also susceptible to breast cancer. He said that many proteins in addition to beta-catenin are involved in the Wnt pathway, any one of which might activate the pathway and trigger self-renewal.

One goal of Weissman’s lab is to identify cancer stem cells in a broad range of cancer types to learn more about which proteins go awry in these cells. Eventually, he said this work could lead to new drugs that shut down these inappropriately active proteins. “When drugs that inhibit those targets become available, combination therapy might have a chance of really working,” Weissman said.

The project to identify cancer stem cells in solid tumors is partly funded through Stanford’s Institute for Cancer/Stem Cell Biology and Medicine, which Weissman directs.

Stanford University Medical Center integrates research, medical education and patient care at its three institutions — Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital & Clinics and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. For more information, please visit the Web site of the medical center’s Office of Communication & Public Affairs at http://mednews.stanford.edu.

http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20040811005018&newsLang=en

Setback On AP3464 Drug

Posted by rob on under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Ariad’s site now indicates they will focus ”on two classes of chemically related back-up compounds of AP23464 in order to initiate clinical trials“. Messages on stock boards speculate on the delay in AP23463. One investor quotes an email from Tom Pearson at Ariad which indicates that by focusing on backups to AP2464 they will be able to develop a “more optimal candidate” for clinical trials. It is not known how long this will delay potential clinical trials of AP23464.

Rob 

 

“Extensive preclinical studies have been conducted on AP23464 along with backup compounds, providing insights into their biologic, metabolic and pharmacologic profiles. Recently obtained results of animal studies in this program have led us to focus our development efforts on two classes of chemically related back-up compounds of AP23464 in order to initiate clinical trials with a product candidate that has a more optimal and competitive metabolic profile.”

(Last Updated: August 2, 2004)

http://www.ariad.com/about/about_profile.html

 

AP23464 – Article July issue of Blood
by: kimi_i2000
07/26/04 08:35 am
Msg: 54401 of 55085
 
.. as we digest the information of the full preclinical and animal
studies of the dual BCR-ABL/SRC inhibitor AP23464, there comes yet
another such inhibitor, AP23464, preclinical studies described in
this July 15 issue of Blood. AP23464 acts against BCR-ABL and
induces cell death of leukemic cells. It also overcomes resistance
conferred by point mutations like Q252H, Y253F, E255K, C-terminal
loop mutant M351T, and activation loop mutant H396P. Unfortunately,
in lab studies, AP23464 is ineffective against the mutation, T315I.

The good news is that another dual inhibitor is coming our way and
this bodes well for Gleevec-resistant patients.

Inhibition of wild-type and mutant Bcr-Abl by AP23464, a potent ATP-
based oncogenic protein kinase inhibitor: Implications for CML.

O’Hare T, Pollock R, Stoffregen EP, Keats JA, Abdullah OM, Moseson
EM, Rivera VM, Tang H, Metcalf III CA, Bohacek RS, Wang Y,
Sundaramoorthi R, Shakespeare WC, Dalgarno D, Clackson T, Sawyer TK,
Deininger MW, Druker BJ.

Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Oregon Health and Science
University, Portland, OR, USA.

The deregulated, oncogenic tyrosine kinase Bcr-Abl causes chronic
myeloid leukemia (CML). Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec, STI571), a Bcr-
Abl kinase inhibitor, selectively inhibits proliferation and promotes
apoptosis of CML cells. Despite the success of imatinib in the
treatment of CML, resistance is observed, particularly in advanced
disease. The most common imatinib resistance mechanism involves Bcr-
Abl kinase domain mutations that impart varying degrees of drug
insensitivity. AP23464, a potent ATP-based inhibitor of Src and Abl
kinases, displays antiproliferative activity against a human CML cell
line and Bcr-Abl transduced Ba/F3 cells (IC(50) = 14 nM; imatinib IC
(50) = 350 nM). AP23464 ablates Bcr-Abl tyrosine phosphorylation,
blocks cell cycle progression, and promotes apoptosis of Bcr-Abl
expressing cells. Biochemical assays with purified GST-Abl kinase
domain confirmed that AP23464 directly inhibits Abl activity.
Importantly, the low nanomolar cellular and biochemical inhibitory
properties of AP23464 extend to frequently observed imatinib-
resistant Bcr-Abl mutants, including nucleotide binding P-loop
mutants Q252H, Y253F, E255K, C-terminal loop mutant M351T, and
activation loop mutant H396P. AP23464 was ineffective against mutant
T315I, an imatinib contact residue. The potency of AP23464 against
imatinib-refractory Bcr-Abl and its distinct binding mode relative to
imatinib warrant further investigation of AP23464 for the treatment
of CML.

http://messages.yahoo.com/bbs?action=m&board=7076574&tid=aria&mid=54401&sid=7076574

W.R. Hambrecht calls ARIA Speculative
by: jonsager (M/Connecticut)
Long-Term Sentiment: Sell
08/09/04 04:25 pm
Msg: 54996 of 55085
 
FROM Dow Jones:
Ariad Pharmaceuticals (ARIA-NNM)
by W.R. Hambrecht (5.04, Aug. 3)
As anticipated, Ariad has initiated additional clinical studies with [potential cancer treatment] AP23573 (mTOR inhibitor) in two indications. However, due to a setback with AP23464…the company is no longer able to predict the timing of human testing. We were expecting initiation of Phase I trials this year. Ariad has become tight-lipped about the progress of its third program, AP23841 (bone-targeted mTOR inhibitor). Stent deals (rapamycin analogues) are no longer anticipated in a specific period. We were hoping for such transactions in the first half. Based on loss of momentum, lack of clarity of timing, and lack of news-flow catalysts in the near term, we are downgrading to Market Perform/Speculative Risk from Market Outperform/Speculative Risk. In accordance with our firm’s policy, we are removing our target price.

http://messages.yahoo.com/bbs?action=m&board=7076574&tid=aria&mid=54996&sid=7076574

Re: Knowledge is power
by: dincincy2000
Long-Term Sentiment: Sell
08/07/04 04:47 pm
Msg: 54896 of 55085
 
Kenyonn,

You are right. The setback is with AP23464. I stand corrected. Thank you for your alertness.


 Posted as a reply to: Msg 54893 by kenyonn2000  

http://messages.yahoo.com/bbs?action=m&board=7076574&tid=aria&mid=54896&sid=7076574

Re: what the fuck is going on here
by: lmaojmho
Long-Term Sentiment: Strong Buy
08/04/04 01:29 pm
Msg: 54743 of 55085
 
Why would they anticipate stent deal? This from JUNE 15 PR from Ariad:

Update on Partnering AP23573 for Use in Drug-delivery Stents: The Company continues to negotiate with potential partners to develop and commercialize drug-delivery stents incorporating AP23573. However, in light of recent developments in the medical device arena, the Company is reassessing the capabilities of potential partners to (1) develop and optimize the metal stent platforms and polymer formulations required for next-generation stents, (2) achieve substantial market penetration due to growing domination of the drug-eluting stent market by one company, and (3) provide meaningful economic value to ARIAD. These considerations, among others, will determine the outcome of these negotiations.

You mislead on dropping the compound, from AUG 2 PR:

As part of the oncogenic kinase inhibitor program, extensive preclinical studies have been conducted on AP23464 along with backup compounds, providing insights into their biologic, metabolic and pharmacologic profiles. Recently obtained results of animal studies in this program have led the Company to focus its development efforts on two classes of chemically related back-up compounds of AP23464 in order to initiate clinical trials with a product candidate that has a more optimal and competitive metabolic profile. Accordingly, the Company is not currently providing updated guidance on the IND filing date.

Dr. Berger added, “We remain strongly committed to our oncogenic kinase inhibitor program which represents a compelling medical and commercial opportunity. Our scientific team and network of academic collaborators understand the cancer targets and inhibitors in this program extremely well. We are actively pursuing a rapid path to selection of the optimal compound for clinical development.”

http://messages.yahoo.com/bbs?action=m&board=7076574&tid=aria&mid=54743&sid=7076574

 

IR response
by: kenyonn2000
08/02/04 03:50 pm
Msg: 54597 of 55086
 
I emailed Tom Pearson at Ariad and asked for a clarification on the apparent problems with 464. Here is his response.

You don’t have to read between the lines to identify the issue: metabolic profile. It is equally clear that we believe by focusing on AP23464 back-ups, we can come up with a more optimal candidate for clinical development. We are not yet prepared to address the issue of timeframe.

The take away is we are determined to let scientific research dictate our decisions. What may appear now to be disappointing may ultimately prove to be promising.

http://messages.yahoo.com/bbs?action=m&board=7076574&tid=aria&mid=54597&sid=7076574

 

Elevated s-phase kinase-associated protein 2 protein expression in acute myelogenous leukemia

Posted by rob on under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Aug 1; 10(15): 5123-30
Min YH, Cheong JW, Lee MH, Kim JY, Lee ST, Hahn JS, Ko YW

PURPOSE: The F-box protein S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) positively regulates the G(1)-S phase transition by controlling the stability of several G(1) regulators, such as p27Kip1. However, the clinical significance of Skp2 in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) remains unknown. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We examined the clinical and biological significance of Skp2 expression in AML and evaluated the relationship between Skp2 and p27Kip1 expression and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) phosphorylation. RESULTS: Western blot analysis showed that high Skp2 expression was observed in 57 (57.6%) cases and significantly correlated with unfavorable cytogenetics (P = 0.035) but not with age, white blood cell count, serum lactic dehydrogenase level, and the French-American-British subtype. An inverse correlation was not observed between Skp2 and p27Kip1 expression. However, p27Kip1 protein was preferentially localized to cytoplasm in the high-Skp2-expression group. The cytoplasmic to nuclear ratio of p27Kip1 expression was significantly correlated with the levels of Skp2 expression (P < 0.001). The frequency of PTEN phosphorylation was significantly higher in the high-Skp2-expression group compared with the low- Skp2-expression group (P = 0.035). The Skp2 overexpression was significantly associated with shorter disease-free survival and overall survival (P = 0.0386 and P = 0.0369, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that Skp2 expression was an independent prognostic factor both in the disease-free survival and overall survival. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that Skp2 expression is an independent marker for a poor prognosis in AML. The presence of a positive correlation between Skp2 and phosphorylated PTEN suggests that an aberration in the PTEN/Skp2 signaling pathway might be operating in AML.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=10780432&uids=15297415

Granulocytic sarcoma with spinal cord compression in chronic myelogenous leukemia: a case report.

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J Med Liban. 2003 Apr-Jun; 51(2): 117-9
Chalhoub-Hachem BR, Kattan JG, Ghosn MG, Abadjian GA, Okais NM

We report on a 19-year-old man with a spinal cord compression secondary to granulocytic sarcoma (GS) as the initial presentation of a chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Blastic crisis developed two months later. According to our case report and to the literature, the diagnosis of GS could predict a rapid progression to blastic phase.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=00239852&uids=15298165

In vitro effects of native human acute myelogenous leukemia blasts on fibroblasts and osteoblasts

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Int J Cancer. 2004 Oct 10; 111(6): 858-867
Glenjen N, Ersv�¦r E, Ryningen A, Bruserud

Bone marrow stromal cells constitute a heterogeneous population, and in the present study we investigated intercellular crosstalk via release of soluble mediators between native human AML blasts and fibroblasts/osteoblasts. Coculture of nonleukemic stromal cells and AML blasts separated by a semipermeable membrane decreased proliferation of the fibroblast line HFL1, and the inhibition was maintained when HFL1 and AML cells were cultured in direct contact. A similar inhibitory effect was observed for osteoblastic sarcoma cell lines (Cal72, SJSA-1) and normal osteoblasts. GM-CSF was released by both nonleukemic cells and a subset of AML blast populations, and increased levels of GM-CSF were detected in AML cocultures with fibroblasts and osteoblastic sarcoma cells when testing AML cell populations with constitutive GM-CSF release. Furthermore, constitutive IL-1beta secretion by AML blasts was detected only for a subset of patients, whereas relatively high levels of IL-1RA were observed for all patients; coculture of AML blasts with HFL1 fibroblasts and osteoblastic sarcoma cells increased IL-1beta levels for patients with constitutive IL-1beta secretion, whereas IL-1RA levels were slightly decreased but still generally higher than IL-1beta levels (tested only for HFL1 fibroblasts). The bidirectional crosstalk between AML blasts and stromal cells with increased release of AML growth factors may be important in leukemogenesis, whereas the decreased stromal cell proliferation combined with the persistent release of IL-1RA may in addition inhibit remaining normal hematopoiesis and thereby contribute to bone marrow failure in AML. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=00207136&uids=15300797

Cloning, Expression, Purification and Crystallization of NHR3 Domain from Acute Myelogenous Leukemia-related Protein AML1-ETO

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Acta Biochim Biophys Sin (Shanghai). 2004 Aug; 36(8): 566-70
Yang HT, Wu DH, Xue XY, Liang WX, Miao XY, Pang H, Chen SJ

The t(8;21) translocation is one of the most frequent chromosome abnormalities in acute myeloid leukemia. This translocation creates a fusion between the acute myelogenous leukemia 1 (AML1, a transcription factor) gene on chromosome 21 and the eight-twenty-one (ETO, a zinc finger nuclear protein) gene on chromosome 8, leading to the repression of certain AML1 target genes. We cloned NHR3 domain coding fragment into vector pGEX-6p-1 using PCR and obtained recombinant plasmid pGEX-6p-1-NHR3, which can be induced to stably overexpress fusion protein in E. coli. Through the purification on GST affinity chromatography column and PreScission protease cleavage, a large amount of NHR3 protein with high purity was obtained. In order to avoid possible interference of some strong negative charged molecules, NHR3 protein was further purified by Mono Q anion exchange chromatography. The NHR3 crystals were grown with hanging drop/vapor diffusion method and the first crystals appeared after four weeks at 18 degrees in 0.2 M Tris-sodium citrate dihydrate, 0.1 M sodium cacodylate, pH 6.5, and 30% iso-propanol (V/V). ESI mass spectrum showed that the molecular weight of this domain was in agreement with its primary structure sequence prediction, and circular dichroism spectral data (190-250 nm) showed that NHR3 had a well-defined secondary structure of 25.9% alpha-helix, 23.2% random coil and 50.9% turn, which was consistent with GOV4 software prediction.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=16729145&uids=15295650

Extended Follow-up of Patients Treated with Imatinib Mesylate (Gleevec) for Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Relapse

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Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Aug 1; 10(15): 5065-71
DeAngelo DJ, Hochberg EP, Alyea EP, Longtine J, Lee S, Galinsky I, Parekkedon B, Ritz J, Antin JH, Stone RM, Soiffer RJ

PURPOSE: Over the last several years, donor lymphocyte infusions have become the standard approach for patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who relapse after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Recent reports indicate that imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) can induce remissions in these patients as well. Less is known about the extent and durability of these responses. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We studied 15 patients treated with imatinib for recurrent CML after SCT, 10 patients with stable phase CML (SP-CML), 1 with accelerated phase (AP-CML), and 4 with blast phase (BP-CML). The dose of imatinib was 600 mg (n = 10) or 400 mg (n = 5) daily. Patients were followed for hematological, cytogenetic, and molecular response. A susbset of responders was followed for changes in donor-derived hematopoietic chimerism. RESULTS: Of the 10 patients with SP-CML, all achieved a hematological response. Within 3 months, five of these patients had achieved a complete cytogenetic response (CCR). By six months, 9 of 10 patients had achieved CCR. The BCR-ABL transcript could not be detected by reverse transcription-PCR in 7 of these 9 patients. Patients who achieved CCR showed evidence of conversion to complete donor chimerism. No patient developed graft-versus-host disease. With a median follow up of 25 months, all patients are alive and 9 of 10 patients remain in CCR. Only one of the 5 patients with AP/BP-CML achieved a complete cytogenetic response. CONCLUSIONS: We find that imatinib is well tolerated in patients with SP-CML who relapse after SCT. Responses were rapid, durable, and associated with conversion to full donor chimerism without graft-versus-host disease. Imantinib was far less effective in patients who relapsed with AP/BP-CML. Imatinib should be evaluated as either an alternative or as an adjunct to donor lymphocyte infusions for patients with SP-CML who relapse after SCT.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=10780432&uids=15297408

Superior Activity of the Combination of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor LAQ824 and the FLT-3 Kinase Inhibitor PKC412

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Clin Cancer Res. 2004 Aug 1; 10(15): 4991-7
Bali P, George P, Cohen P, Tao J, Guo F, Sigua C, Vishvanath A, Scuto A, Annavarapu S, Fiskus W, Moscinski L, Atadja P, Bhalla K

PURPOSE: Mutant FLT-3 receptor tyrosine kinase is a client protein of the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 and is commonly present and contributes to the leukemia phenotype in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). LAQ824, a cinnamyl hydroxamate histone deacetylase inhibitor, is known to induce acetylation and inhibition of heat shock protein 90. Here, we determined the effects of LAQ824 and/or PKC412 (a FLT-3 kinase inhibitor) on the levels of mutant FLT-3 and its downstream signaling, as well as growth arrest and cell-death of cultured and primary human AML cells. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The effect of LAQ824 and/or PKC412 treatment was determined on the levels of FLT-3 and phosphorylated (p)-FLT-3, on downstream pro-growth and pro-survival effectors, e.g., p-STAT5, p-AKT, and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, and on the cell cycle status and apoptosis in the cultured MV4-11 and primary AML cells with mutant FLT-3. RESULTS: Treatment with LAQ824 promoted proteasomal degradation and attenuation of the levels of FLT-3 and p-FLT-3, associated with cell cycle G(1)-phase accumulation and apoptosis of MV4-11 cells. This was accompanied by attenuation of p-STAT5, p-AKT, and p-ERK1/2 levels. STAT-5 DNA-binding activity and the levels of c-Myc and oncostatin M were also down-regulated. Cotreatment with LAQ824 and PKC412 synergistically induced apoptosis of MV4-11 cells and induced more apoptosis of the primary AML cells expressing mutant FLT-3. This was also associated with more attenuation of p-FLT-3, p-AKT, p-ERK1/2, and p-STAT5. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of LAQ824 and PKC412 is highly active against human AML cells with mutant FLT-3, which merits in vivo studies of the combination against human AML.

http://www.hubmed.org/display.cgi?issn=10780432&uids=15297399

Couple suing insurance company over leukemia coverage

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Couple suing insurance company over leukemia coverage

Posted Wednesday, August 11, 2004

When Jerry Duncan of Park Ridge lost his job around January 2002, his thoughts naturally turned to health insurance for himself and his wife, Carmen.

So, he found a policy he could afford to tide him over between jobs. But, when an inflammation in Carmen’s mouth turned out to be leukemia, the couple found themselves in a bureaucratic dispute over the definition of “preexisting illness” that could result in them losing their home.

They’re suing in Cook County court to try to make the insurance company pay.

As he began looking for new work, the federal COBRA law allowed Jerry Duncan to extend his company insurance for up to 18 months, but a one-month extension would have cost nearly $695.

So, the Duncans shopped around and found what they thought was a better solution to their problem. Through an agent in Park Ridge, they bought a short-term health insurance policy for a month for $366.

Jerry Duncan planned to have another job – and thus insurance – within that first month, but as the recession of 2002 progressed, the couple ended up purchasing new short-term policies four more times over the next year. Each time, they bought the policy from the same company, Fortis Insurance Co. of Milwaukee, Wis., now known as Assurant Health.

On Jan. 28, 2003, according to the lawsuit, Carmen Duncan’s dentist sent her to an oral surgeon because of an inflammation in her mouth. That surgeon on March 3 found no evidence of any long-term illness, and on March 10 said her mouth was “healing well,” the suit claims.

On March 17, the Duncans again purchased a short-term policy, and less than three weeks later, doctors at Advocation Lutheran General Hospital in Park Ridge diagnosed Carmen with acute myelogenous leukemia. Over the next six months, her treatments for the disease cost $250,000, the suit says.

Fortis, the suit says, refused to cover the treatments, citing its clause on pre-existing illness, which refuses coverage for illness diag-nosed or treated in the 12 months prior to the effective date of the policy.

The Duncans, who had had Fortis policies for more than a year before the cancer diagnosis, claim in their suit that Fortis misled them. Although the company’s denial letter is not included in the lawsuit, the company apparently reset the clock on the one-year period each time a new policy was purchased, the suit indicates.

Fortis failed “to reveal to plaintiffs its practice and policy of denying payment of medical expenses incurred during a successive policy if the illness could have been diagnosed during the term of the prior (short-term) policy,” the suit says.

Fortis either should have notified the Duncans it wouldn’t pay their costs when it got the dental exam records or it shouldn’t have allowed them to buy a new policy on March 17, the suit states.

Citing client confidentiality, Fortis would not discuss the case. But a spokesman, Rob Guilbert said, “We do, of course, always want and are committed to adhering to our contracts with our customers.”

The firm has also not yet replied in court documents, but a copy of the policy clearly states on the front, “This policy is not renewable.”

Carmen Duncan declined comment for this story. Her lawyer, Robert E. Williams, declined comment also because he is currently in negotiations with Fortis on a possible settlement.

But the suit, which also seeks damages in addition to the medical bill payments, indicates the Duncans have had a rough time since the denial.

“Plaintiffs have been threatened with suit by various collection agencies,” it says, adding they have suffered mental anguish from “the threat of losing their home.”

The case is scheduled for a hearing Oct. 13 before Cook County Judge Stuart A. Nudelman.

Policy: Possible settlement is in negotiations

http://www.dailyherald.com/cook/main_story.asp?intID=38210334

Leukemia Clinical Trials

Posted by rob on under Uncategorized | Be the First to Comment

Alabama

Birmingham; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Arizona

Tucson; Arizona Clinical Research Center, Inc.
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

California

Berkeley; Alta Bates Comprehensive Cancer Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Berkeley; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Burbank; Providence St. Joseph Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
COG ADVLO116: A Phase I Trial and Pharmacokinetic Study of R115777 in Pediatric Patients With Refractory Leukemias

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
SWOG C9710: Phase III Randomized Study Of Concurrent Tretinoin And Chemotherapy With Or Without Arsenic Trioxide As Intial Consolidation Therapy Versus Observation For Patients With Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (New Protocol)

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
COG A003: Phase I Trial and Pharmacokinetic Study of Arsenic Trioxide in Pediatric Patients with Refractory Leukemia or Lymphoma

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
Autologous Transplantation for Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Following Complete or Partial Cytogenetic Response Following Gleevec (STI-571) Treatment

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
COG #AALL01P2: Intensive Induction Therapy for Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) who Experience a Bone Marrow Relapse

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
A Phase II Study of Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (Mylotarg) and Standard Dose Ara-C for Patients with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
Phase II Trial Utilizing Idarubicin in Combination with High-Dose Ara-C for Induction Therapy for Adult Acute Myelogenous Leukemia

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center
CALGB/CCG C9710: Phase III Randomized Study of Concurrent Tretinion and Chemotherapy with or without Arsenic Trioxide (As203) (NSC # 706363) as Initial Consolidation Therapy Followed by Intermittent Tretinoin Maintenance Therapy Versus Observation for Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center[*]
A Phase II, Multicenter Study of Decitabine (5-AZA-2′ Deoxycytidine) in Myelogenous Leukemia Chronic Phase Refractory to Imatinib Mesylate (STI 571)

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center[*]
Filgrastim-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Stem Cells for Primary Allogeneic Transplantation with Unrelated Donors

Duarte; City of Hope National Medical Center[*]
A Phase II, Multicentered Study of Decitabine (5-Aza-2′-Deoxycytidine) in Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Accelerated Phase Refractory to Imatinib Mesylate (STI 571)

Greenbrae; California Cancer Care
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

La Jolla; Research Site[*]
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Los Angeles; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Los Angeles; Norris Cancer Center
A study to investigate the effects of arsenic trioxide in treating patients with Acute promyeloctyic leukemia (APL).

Los Gatos; Pacific Oncology Association
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Orange; Hematology Oncology Medical Group of Orange County
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Stanford; Stanford Univ Med Ctr
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Various Cities; Dana Farber – Center for Outcomes and Policy Research
Harvard Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Study

Vista; San Diego Cancer Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Colorado

Denver; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Denver; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Connecticut

Farmington; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Hartford; St. Francis Hospital
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Florida

Ft. Lauderdale; Holy Cross Hospital
ID# 03-10: Non-Myeloid Malignancies – Patients Receiving Chemotherapy

Jupiter; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Lakeland; Watson Clinic Center for Cancer Care & Research
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Miami; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Miami; University of Miami
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Orlando; Hematology & Oncology Consultants, PA
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Orlando; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Various Cities; Dana Farber – Center for Outcomes and Policy Research
Harvard Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Study

West Palm Beach; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Georgia

Augusta; Medical College of Georgia
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Macon; Central Georgia Hematology/Oncology Associates, PC
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Savannah; Memorial Health Research Center
A Phase II Study Of Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (Mylotarg) And Standard Dose Ara-C For Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). (SWOG S0117)

Savannah; Memorial Health Research Center
A Phase III Randomized Trial Of Fludarabine And Cyclophosphamide Versus Fludarabine For Previously Untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (ECOG Intergroup Study) (CALGB 10103)

Tucker; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Valdosta; South Georgia Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Illinois

Chicago; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Chicago; Northwestern University School of Medicine
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Chicago; Univ of Chicago
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Elk Grove Village; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Skokie; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Indiana

Beech Grove; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Indianapolis; Indiana Oncology Hematology Consultants
Antibody chemotherapy agent targeting leukemic cells

Indianapolis; Indiana Oncology Hematology Consultants
Research Study for AML / High Risk MDS.

Indianapolis; Indiana Oncology Hematology Consultants
Study Evaluating Whether The Addition Of Amifostine (Ethyol®) Will Enable The Safe Increase In Dose Intensity Of Idarubicin In Combination With Cytosine Arabinoside In Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Indianapolis; Indiana Oncology Hematology Consultants
Phase IB/II, 1st line, at least 60 yrs, histologically confirmed newly diagnosed. AML (at least 20% myeloblasts 5 days prior to randomization) not previously treated with cytotoxic therapy.

Kansas

Kansas City; University of Kansas Medical Center
Study Evaluating Whether The Addition Of Amifostine (Ethyol®) Will Enable The Safe Increase In Dose Intensity Of Idarubicin In Combination With Cytosine Arabinoside In Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Kansas City; University of Kansas Medical Center Research Institute[*]
Study for patients age 60 or older with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML)

Louisiana

New Orleans; Oncology & Hematology Specialists, LLC
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Maine

Scarborough; Maine Center for Cancer Medicine and Blood Disorders
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Maryland

Baltimore; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Clinton; Oncology Hematolgy Associates, P.A.
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Massachusetts

Boston; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Boston; Dana Farber Cancer Institute
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Boston; Dana Farber – Center for Outcomes and Policy Research
Harvard Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Study

Boston; Massachusetts General Hospital,Brigham and Womens Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Memory and Concentration Study

Boston; Tufts-New England Medical Center
Phase II Study of RFS 2000 (9-Nitro-Camptothecin, 9-NC) in Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia (R902)

Boston; Massachusetts General Hospital
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Boston; Dana Farber Cancer Institute
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Michigan

Detroit; Harper Hospital
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

St. Joseph; Oncology Care Associates, P.L.L.C.
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Mississippi

Jackson; Jackson Oncology Associates, PLLC
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Missouri

St. Louis; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Nebraska

Omaha; Univ of Nebraska Medical Center
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

New Hampshire

Lebanon; Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

New Jersey

Cherry Hill; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Hackensack; Hackensack University Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Hackensack; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

New Brunswick; The Cancer Institute of New Jersey
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

New Mexico

Sante Fe; New Mexico Cancer Care Associates
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

New York

Armonk; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Bronx; Comprehensive Cancer Center at Our Lady of Mercy Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Brooklyn; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Buffalo; Roswell Park Cancer Institute
A Pilot Study of Genasenseâ?¢ (Oblimersen Sodium, Bcl-2 Antisense Oligonucleotide), Fludarabine and Rituximab in Previously Treated and Untreated Subjects with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

Buffalo; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

New Hyde Park; Long Island Jewish Medical Center
A Pilot Study of Genasenseâ?¢ (Oblimersen Sodium, Bcl-2 Antisense Oligonucleotide), Fludarabine and Rituximab in Previously Treated and Untreated Subjects with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

New York; Mount Sinai Medical Center
A Phase I-II Pilot Study of Divalproex Sodium and All-Trans-Retinoic Acid (ATRA) in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (except M3, FAB Classification)

New York; Mount Sinai Medical Center
Randomized Phase II Study of Thalidomide Versus Thalidomide Plus Fludarabine for Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia Previously Treated with Fludarabine

New York; Rockefeller University Hospital
Anti-tumor immunity in multiple myeloma

New York; Biomedical Research Alliance of New York
T-Cell Leukemia- Adults

New York; Mount Sinai School of Medicine
A Phase II, Multi-Center, Open-Label, Repeat-Dose Study of BCX-1777 Infusion in Patients with Advanced T-Cell Leukemia with an Option of Long-Term BCX-1777 Use

New York; New York Presbyterian Hospital – Weill Medical College of Cornell University
A Phase II, Multi-Center, Open-Label, Repeat-Dose Study of BCX-1777 Infusion in Patients with Advanced T-Cell Leukemia with an Option of Long-Term BCX-1777 Use

New York; Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center
Study of donor leukocyte infusions in patients with recurrent or persistent hematological malignancies after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

New York; Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center
Study of the use of peripheral blood stem cells for allogeneic transplantation (PBSCT) in patients with advanced hematological malignancies at increased risk of relapse or transplant-related mortality

New York; Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center
Study of autografting for advanced phase chronic myeloid leukemia

New York; Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center
Study of transplantation using umbilical cord and placental blood

New York City; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Nyack; Union State Bank Cancer Center at Nyack Hospital
FluCam-106: Phase III trial comparing combination treatment in patients with B-cell CLL

Nyack; Union State Bank Cancer Center at Nyack Hospital
20030625: A study of the effectiveness and safety of three different drugs for low grade lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Nyack; Union State Bank Cancer Center of Nyack Hospital
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Rochester; Upstate NY Cancer Research & Education Foundation
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
A Phase III Randomized Trial to evaluate 2 drug therapies for previously untreated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplanation for CLL, CML, AML, ALL, Myelodysplasia and Non-Hodgkinâ??s Lymphoma after Total Body Irradiation and Cyclophosphamide Conditioning or Cyclophosphamide and ATG Conditioning For Aplastic Anemia.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First or Second Remission.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Utilizing Non-Myeloablative Conditioning Therapy. A Phase II Study.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia in First or Second Remission.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
A Phase III Randomized Trial to evaluate two drug therapies for patients with previously untreated B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, also evaluate side effects, survival, and change of genetic characteristics of disease and remission.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
A Phase II Study of a study drug in T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
A study Comparing 2 different drug therapies with untreated acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), evaluate side effects, survival, and change of genetic characteristics of disease and remission.

Syracuse; SUNY Upstate Medical University
A study to provide treatment for patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.

Valhalla; New York Medical College
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Various Cities; Dana Farber – Center for Outcomes and Policy Research
Harvard Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) Study

North Carolina

Winston Salem; Wake Forest University School of Medicine
Study Evaluating Whether The Addition Of Amifostine (Ethyol®) Will Enable The Safe Increase In Dose Intensity Of Idarubicin In Combination With Cytosine Arabinoside In Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Winston-Salem; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center – Industry Relations Office, Office of Research
Phase II Study of GM-CSF in Patients with Chronic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CP-CML) who are Not in Complete Cytogenetic Remission after Initial Therapy

Winston-Salem; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Winston-Salem; Wake Forest University School of Medicine
CCCWFU 22204 – Fusion Protein Therapy of Elderly or Poor-risk AML with DT388IL3 (IND 11314): A Phase I/II Clinical Trial

Winston-Salem; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center – Industry Relations Office, Office of Research[*]
Fusion Protein Therapy of Imatinib-Resistant Myeloid Blast Crisis Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) with DT388IL3 (IND# 11314): a Phase I/II Clinical Trial (BG04-159)

Winston-Salem; Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center – Industry Relations Office, Office of Research[*]
Fusion Protein Therapy of Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) with DT388IL3 (IND# 11314): a Phase I/II Clinical Trial (BG04-296)

North Dakota

Bismarck; Clinical Research Services
Research study for acute Myeloid Leukemia.

Ohio

Cleveland; Cleveland VA Medical Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Cleveland; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Oregon

Portland; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

Portland; Oregan Health Sciences University
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Salem; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Pennsylvania

Bethlehem; St. Luke’s Hospital & Health Network
Phase III Randomized Study of Concurrent Tretinoin and Chemotherapy with or without Arsenic Trioxide (As2O3) (NSC #706363) as Initial Consolidation Therapy followed by Maintenance Therapy with Intermittent Tretinoin Versus Intermittent Tretinoin Plus Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate for Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia.

Bethlehem; St. Luke’s Hospital and Health Network
A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Double Blind Trial of the Administration of the MDR Modulator Zosuquidar Trihyrochloride (LY335979) during Conventional Induction and Post-Remission Therapy in Patients greater than 60 years with Newly Diagnosed AML, RAEB-T or RAEB.

Pittsburgh; Western Pennsylvania Cancer Institute (WPCI)
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Pittsburgh; University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute/Hillman Cancer Center
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Pittsburgh; Research Site[*]
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

South Carolina

Charleston; Charleston Hematology Oncology
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Spartanburg; SRMC – Clinical Research
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Spartanburg; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Tennessee

Germantown; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Memphis; Baptist Clinical Research Center
Study Evaluating Whether The Addition Of Amifostine (Ethyol®) Will Enable The Safe Increase In Dose Intensity Of Idarubicin In Combination With Cytosine Arabinoside In Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Memphis; St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital
A phase III clinical trial for patients with newly diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)

Nashville; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Texas

Austin; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Dallas; Center for Oncology Research & Treatment, PA
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Dallas; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Fort Worth; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Houston; S. R. Burzynski Clinic
Phase II Study Of Antineoplaston A10 And AS2-1 In Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

Houston; S. R. Burzynski Clinic
Phase II Study Of Antineoplastons A10 And AS2-1 In Patients With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

Virginia

Abingdon; Cancer Outreach Associates, PC
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Arlington; Arlington-Fairfax Hematology Oncology
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Charlottesville; University of Virginia
Trentinoin & Chemo w/ or w/o Arsenic Trioxide v Observation of Untreated Promyelocytic Leukemia

Charlottesville; University of Virginia
Protocol for Pateients with Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia-A Phase III Study

Newport News; Research Site
Ongoing Clinical Trial for Patients with Newly Diagnosed Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia.

Washington

Seattle; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Seattle; University of Washington
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Tacoma; Northwest Kinetics
Research study for men and women with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL).

Washington, DC

Washington; Georgetown University Medical Center
A Pilot Study of Genasenseâ?¢ (Oblimersen Sodium, Bcl-2 Antisense Oligonucleotide), Fludarabine and Rituximab in Previously Treated and Untreated Subjects with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

West Virginia

Morgantown; Morgantown Internal Medicine Group
CLL (Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) combination treatment with Fludarabine and either the monoclonal antibody Campath or Rituximab.

Wisconsin

Milwaukee; Medical College of Wisconsin
Study Evaluating Whether The Addition Of Amifostine (Ethyol®) Will Enable The Safe Increase In Dose Intensity Of Idarubicin In Combination With Cytosine Arabinoside In Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

International

Westmead NSW, Australia; Westmead Hospital
This is a phase I/II study that will determine first the maximum tolerated dose (safety) of Mylotarg given with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed/refractory patients with AML, and in younger (less than 60) de novo patients with AML.

Udine, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy; Ospedale della Misericordia
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Barcelona, Spain; H. Sta. Creu I Sant Pau Servic
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Barcelona, Spain; Hospital Clinic i Provincial
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Rotterdam, The Netherlands; AZR – DijkzigtHospital Dijkzigt
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Rotterdam, The Netherlands; Erasmus University
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Cardiff, South Glamorgan, United Kingdom; University Hospital of Wales
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Liverpool, United Kingdom; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

London, United Kingdom; Research Site
Antigenics Inc. is enrolling up to 40 patients in a Phase II Exploratory clinical study, studying an investigational, personalized immunotherapeutic (AG-858) in combination with FDA-approved Gleevec® in patients with Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) in chronic phase.

London, United Kingdom; Department of Clinical Haematology
A dose-ranging study of the safety and efficacy of gemtuzumab ozogamicin (go) given in combination with cytarabine and daunorubicin in relapsed or refractory patients and in younger de novo patients with acute myeloid leukemia

Pic Of The Day

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Hundreds of floating lanterns are sebt floating down the Urakami river in Nagasaki to commemorate victims of the 1945 nuclear bombing.